As the Rose Blossoms: The Ongoing Unfolding of a Dream’s Meaning

Cultivate dreams like roses.

Be Sure to Smell the Roses!

Like the pedals of a rose, a dream’s meaning may take a while to unfold, only coming to complete disclosure many years after the dream itself was dreamed. What may appear to be at first a tightly bound and unpromising dream, could be just a bud making its first appearance, and eventually come into full glory it is own season.

Most of us have no trouble remembering a great dream or one loaded with feeling. There are usually three or four dreams that will hold clear in the memory over a lifetime. But in our lifetime we have many thousands of dreams, which for most people, pass by unrecognized, devalued and not learned from. Dream journaling, the practice of recording every dream we can remember, is a significant step to reclaiming the lost wisdom in those other dreams. It is a way of cultivating the unpromising buds and most importantly, it is a way of harvesting the magnificent result.

When we have a dream we remember, most of us will give it a moment’s thought and then forget about it. If we have good memories, or good associational abilities, we might remember the dream when something happens in our waking life to trigger the memory of that dream. Then we might see the connection between the dream and what it might be saying about something happening in our waking life.

Writing down the dream allows us to not only make note of the dream, but it also encourages us to give more than a passing thought to the dream. We can reflect on it and ask ourselves what this dream is trying to tell us about our lives right now. More importantly, it will also allow the dreamer to come back months and years later to see how that dream—one which may have long been forgotten—unfolded and blossomed, and how it manifested over the years, giving perhaps an entirely different meaning than the one first ascribed to it, and giving new insight into a major theme of life’s meaning.

  • There may be a meaning given to the dream at its first appearance, in mid-bloom perhaps some months or years later, and in full bloom when the dream fully manifests itself, sometimes much later in waking life. Reviewing the dream journal at various stages, and making note of the various meanings given to the dream at each stage, gives new and growing perspectives.
  • The dreamer may also note other dreams that may be related to, or be an development of the original dream.

With these dreams as guideposts to see how they correspond to and inform waking reality, inner spiritual growth may be monitored and appreciated. The dreamer can easily see then that one tiny dream may blossom into a magnificent flower or may contain the seeds for a garden of roses, and that deep within us lives the wisdom for living our lives.

To learn more about dreams and dreamwork, visit my website at http://www.healingdreamgarden.com.

Learning to Trust Inner Wisdom: Often a Slow Process

Intuitive mind is a gift.  Rational mind is a servant.  Our society honors the servant.

Image via Pinterest

Two of the biggest stumbling blocks to intuitive learning are a reluctance to trust:

  1. information coming from our own inner resources and
  2. the process for acquiring that information.

There are many reasons for this which can range from our society’s distrust of information that cannot be quantified in a scientific manner to the prejudices of our education and upbringing which didn’t teach us to be intuitive or actually discouraged us from trying to be intuitive. For example, many of us were told to not take dreams seriously, or were told to ignore a gut feeling that was gnawing away at us. If we are uncertain or ignorant about our interior resources, we most certainly will be distrustful of processes that claim to nurture or access those resources.

It seems that people come to the awareness that they can trust their inner resources through some serendipitous event, a freely given grace in their lives. After such a significant event, people may begin to reflect upon the event because it has made such a significant impact in their lives. After a series of similar “inner knowings” coming at times when needed, people then begin to take their inner wisdom seriously. And only after all this, do they set about learning ways that can pro-actively access that inner wisdom. It is often a slow learning process.

I am reminded of a comment one of my friends said to me the other day. She had been nervous about getting a scan of her head, wondering what the outcome would be. Just before the procedure she had an unsolicited dream which told her things would be fine, no doubt giving her more confidence when she went for the test. That indeed turned out to be the case! She was excited and happy to tell me what happened. She said, “I remember you said something like this can happen. Now I know it can!” What was important to her was the discovery that her own inner wisdom could accurately tell her something she wanted to know. My telling her numerous times before did not make the initial difference. It was her own discovery that opened up new doors to personal awareness. What I told her was just another confirmation of the validity of her ability. This illustrates the importance of being open to challenging experiences, as she is, especially when it comes to developing a trust in our own inner wisdom. Now that she knew she had the inner resources, I reminded her she could access this information in a pro-active way (Dream Incubation) by requesting dreams that would answer specific questions to future concerns she might have. By the look on her face, I suspected she had some natural doubts about this happening but I have no doubt that eventually she will come to trust the process if she thinks to ask for a dream.