Workshop: Learning From Dreams and Intuition What It Means to be Healthy

The workshop is part of
Harmony Health & Wellness which meets at
Davis Hall, The Cathedral of St. Andrew
Ongoing Mondays, 3:30 to 6:00 pm

This dreamwork workshop on intentional dreaming for healing and spiritual growth will also bring in Hawaiian concepts about dreams and health and is led by Fran Kramer who has over forty years’ experience working with dreams. The workshop is in the same hall and runs from 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm. There is no fee but donations are accepted to support the work of Fran and Harmony Health & Wellness.

The workshop started Monday, July 11, 2016 and continues weekly on an ongoing basis. There is plenty of paid parking but free parking is limited. Feel free to join us. You may consider taking the bus.

Bus numbers 2, 13, 19, and 20 from Waikiki stop in front of the State Capitol. The Cathedral is 1/2 block further along Beretania Street from the Capitol.

Working With Dream Themes: Repetitive Dreams

Repetitive dreams need to be taken seriously.

Dreams Can Reflect the Soul’s Purpose

Perhaps the most frequent question I get asked is, “Why do I have the same dream over and over?”  This is so is probably because everyone at some time or other has had a recurring dream.  A recurring dream presents itself over and over, sometimes as often as nightly but more often, at odd times over a period of months or years.   The dreamer usually feels that if the dream is repeating itself, it must be important and therefore wants to ask about it.  And the dreamer is right!  Repetitive dreams are important and should be taken seriously.

Repetitive Dreams: Like a Visitor Knocking on the Door

A repetitive dream is like a persistent visitor knocking on the door and will come back if no one answers the door.  The visitor has something important to say and wants to say it, and won’t give up so easily.  Therefore, the best way to deal with a repetitive dream is to open the door and listen; that is, pay attention to the dream, ask questions of the dream, and see what it is trying to say.

Possible Types of Repetitive Dreams
  • Warning dreams.  These dreams act as alerts on how the dreamer is not living his or her life appropriately.  For example, if a person is not exercising enough over a long period of time, the dreamer may get a recurring dream about an athlete or a doctor coming into the room.
  • Prophetic dreams. Prophetic dreams provide a glimpse into possible future directions.  Repeated dreams about a person filling a role not currently held may be the call to a new vocation or job that would enhance the quality of the dreamer’s life.  The dream is trying to encourage the dreamer to take steps towards getting into the new work.
  • Commentary dreams. Actions or symbols occurring in a repetitive dream might be trying to make a values statement to the dreamer on how the dreamer is handling an issue in life.  Is the dreamer living according to his or her true inner standards, as opposed to someone else’s standards?  For example, a repetitive dream of losing one’s wallet may indicate that the dreamer is susceptible to losing his or her identity or sense of worth, and should trust more in life and the process that is going on in life.
Ending a Recurring Dream

Whatever your repetitive dream is, take it seriously by reflecting on what it means and by asking what association it might have with something important in your waking life at the moment.  If you get an “Aha” response, act on it.  Chances are if you have heard and acted on the recurring dream, it will stop coming because it has served its purpose.

Why Is the World in Chaos?

Again Jean Raffa presents her great insights on emerging Consciousness: Please read, this article does much to explain what many of us are feeling from a spiritual perspective.

Matrignosis: A Blog About Inner Wisdom

images“The ego has the capacity of seeing itself, at least in some measure, in relation to the rest of the world, a power that the autos does not have.  It also becomes aware that others likewise possess ego consciousness and the power of criticism.  Thus it is aware of what others think and say, and aware also of what it for its own part thinks and speaks.  It can say, “I am the one, I am the thinker, the doer.

“But beyond this it does not go.  For instance, a man in this stage of self-consciousness does not realize as a rule that ideas occur to him without his willing them, that actions are performed through him—that he is being used by thoughts and impulses arising from something other than his I.” E. Harding, Psychic Energy, p. 204.

We live in an era dominated by Epoch II masculine-oriented ego consciousness…

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Can We Make the Term Priestess Respectable?

A prietess is a woman who helps others connect to the divine.

Image via Pinterest.

While surfing on Pinterest I saw a definition of priestess and realized that I am truly one, along with some amazing ladies I know.  It is what I have been attempting to do ever since I began teaching dreamwork and meditation years ago.  Here is the definition:

A priestess is a woman who helps others connect to the divine so that they can heal and/or actualize their soul’s path.

I have found it interesting that women priests in the Episcopal Church are called priests and not priestess.  Perhaps the term resonates with witchcraft, and the wild things beyond the control of civilized constructs such as organized religion.  For sure, the term is connected to what the Hawaiians would call mana, or power.  Such power, no matter if it is a force of nature, or a force of our own souls or the force of a divine power, is indeed outside the control of humans.  Yet, this energy is what drives real spiritual enlightenment, healing, growth and conversion.  It is what religion is truly all about.   In resurrecting the term priestess, we can perhaps also bring back, or let back in again, the sacred life-giving energy that is needed to rejuvenate a person or a congregation.

I think all great priests, men or women, truly act out their calling when they serve this sacred function of connecting people to the divine, especially in a highly personal way such as attending to the needs of a dying person, doing spiritual direction, or healing a community conflict in such a way that it brings out the best in everyone.   However, nowadays,  sadly, emphasis is usually put elsewhere so that people are first more readily to identify priests as the performers of rituals and homilies that may or may not inspire and functionaries of religious organizations, not much different from a corporate CEO.   No wonder people, so many people, have a hard time finding life in a church!

All people hunger for an experience of the sacred.  Perhaps it will take priestesses to do the job, if the priests (male and female) don’t measure up to the job.  If this is the case, organized religion perhaps can expect to see a decline in attendance.